Ford Future of Transportation Lecture Series: Dr. Roberto Horowitz

Tuesday, May 7, 2019
12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m.
2164 Glenn L. Martin Hall
Anahita Ganapathi
301 405 3671
ganahita@umd.edu

Generously sponsored by Ford

Modeling, Control and Estimation of Traffic Road Networks

Roberto Horowitz

James Fife Endowed Chair

Professor and Chair, Department of Mechanical Engineering

University of California, Berkeley

This talk discusses some of the recent advancements in management and estimation of our traffic road networks. Traffic congestion is a major source of world-wide inefficiency, with one study estimating that, in 2014, delays due to congestion cost 7 billion hours and $160B in the US alone. However, mitigating congestion through management techniques is difficult, as traffic congestion exists in a confluence of complex phenomena. Growth of traffic demand shows no sign of decreasing, so continued infrastructure expansion must be combined with continued development of traffic control engineering to abate these societal costs. Some of today's traffic control efforts make use of novel formulations of these nonlinear systems and new sources of data provided by the connected and autonomous vehicles now entering the fleet.

This talk will focus on a set of modeling and simulation tools for traffic operations planning. It will cover basic controllability and observability properties of traffic dynamics, in addition to a set of parameter calibration, ramp flow estimation and sensor fault detection algorithms that were developed in order to achieve reliable simulation of freeway traffic. Finally, it will focus on traffic management frameworks and analytics.

Roberto Horowitz is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at UC Berkeley and holds the James Fife Endowed Chair in the College of Engineering.  He received a B.S. degree with highest honors in 1978 and a Ph.D. degree in 1983 in mechanical engineering from the University of California at Berkeley and became a faculty member of the Mechanical Engineering Department in 1982. Dr. Horowitz teaches and conducts research in the areas of adaptive, learning, nonlinear and optimal control, with applications to Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS), computer disk file systems, robotics, mechatronics and Intelligent Vehicle and Highway Systems (IVHS). He is currently the Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering Department and a former co-director of the Partners for Advanced Transportation Technology (PATH) research center at U.C. Berkeley. Dr. Horowitz is a member of IEEE and ASME. He is the recipient of the 2010 ASME Dynamic Systems and Control Division (DSCD) Henry M. Paynter Outstanding Investigator Award and the ASME 2018 Rufus Oldenburger Medal in recognition of his pioneering and impactful contributions to control applications in mechatronics, magnetic data storage and traffic systems.

 

Audience: Clark School  All Students  Graduate  Undergraduate  Faculty  Staff  Post-Docs  Alumni  Employers  Corporate  Donors 

 

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