Faculty Directory

Kishek, Rami

Kishek, Rami

Associate Research Professor
Institute for Research in Electronics & Applied Physics
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Energy Research Facility, Rm. #1202G
Website(s):

BACKGROUND

Dr. Rami Kishek received his B.S.E. in Electrical Engineering (1993), M.S.E. in Nuclear Engineering (1995), and Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering (1997), from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. After obtaining his Ph.D., Professor Kishek joined the Institute for Research in Electronics & Applied Physics at the University of Maryland, College Park, MD. Kishek is a Senior Member of IEEE, as well as a member of APS, AAAS, Tau Beta Pi, and Eta Kappa Nu.

Research Interests:

Particle accelerators are a foundation pillar for modern science and technology. By propelling subatomic particles to high energy, accelerators function as powerful microscopes peering on scales too small to see, from DNA molecules down to elementary particles. Lower-energy accelerators have many uses, such as cancer treatment or industrial processing. Future accelerators can also aid in harnessing fusion energy to fuel the future.

At the University of Maryland, we aspire to understand the science of accelerated beams so we can build better accelerators. Our quest is to increase the brightness of beams so as to make accelerators more efficient, to enable detection of rare particles, and to illuminate nano-sized molecules in motion. We do so with an innovative program based on low-cost, scaled experiments that are closely-coupled with theory and computer simulation. We are committed to educating students by involving them in a first-rate research program and exposing them to many aspects of designing, building, and running an accelerator.

Kishek Named 2013 APS Fellow

IREAP and ECE Research Professor Rami Kishek honored for work on particle beams

Tobin Receives Fermilab's Peoples Fellowship

Prestigious 3-year fellowship will support Ph.D. graduate's research at the frontiers of high energy physics.

Tobin Wins Award at International School for Linear Colliders

ECE graduate student Charles Tobin honored with Distinguished Performance Award.